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11 Ways The World Could End

Since the 1500s, there have been more than150 documented predictions of when the world is going to end. Luckily for us, none of themhave come true…yet. However, you'll be surprised that not allof them are destructive. Here are some terrifyingly amazing ways theworld, genuinely could end. When you think of scientists working on superviruses, you probably picture Hazmat workers, deep in a mountain bunker, studying vats fullof insidious green liquid. But these labs do actually exist! Maybe notworking for some shady Bondstyle villain looking to ransom the world away to the highestbidder, but for pharmaceutical companies and

government agencies studying ways to curedangerous pathogens. But what happens when a vial full of an extremely dangerous virusbreaks out of containment, or is misplacedé Over the years, there have been numerous documentedcases of dangerous viruses escaping from laboratories around the world. One of these happened asrecently as 2009. A group of scientists based in Europe, workingwith Baxter Pharmaceuticals, were conducting lab tests on a seasonal flu strain.Without realizing it, Baxter had sent them live supplies of the H5N1 virus, better knownas “bird flu,â€� which has a mortality rate higher than 60%. One of the world's deadliestviruses was handled and distributed to three

other labs without any pathogen safety protocolsin place. The grave error was only realized when onelab worker in the Czech Republic inoculated a group of ferrets with samples of the “seasonflu� batch, and was horrified when they all died.The scientists were immediately placed under quarantine and monitored for signs of thedeadly virus. Luckily, none of them were infected and all the scientists were freed with a cleanbill of health. Two years later, these same strains of avianand human flu were combined in a laboratory, successfully creating “the most dangerousvirus in history.� The virus was highly

pathogenic, while retaining its dangerouslyhigh fatality rate. If it got loose, it could kill 60% of the world's population in afreakishly short amount of time – a truly apocalyptic notion.Some say it's only a matter of time before this kind of virus escapes containment andwreaks havoc on mankind. After going through two world wars, you wouldthink that the world would have learned to get along by now. But unfortunately for thesurvival of humanity, we are constantly under threat of triggering the final war – NuclearArmageddon. Mutually Assured Destruction, like its acronymsuggests, is one of the maddest doctrines

ever devised. It ensures that if a countrywere to ever use a nuclear weapon on another state with the same capability, both sideswould unleash their entire nuclear arsenal, bringing about the complete annihilation ofboth countries. With the resulting nuclear winter, and the likely participation of othercountries in the exchange, this would almost certainly lead to destruction and death onan apocalyptic scale. There are over 15,000 nuclear warheads inthe world, with more than 4000 ready to fire at any one time. That would make one hellof a firework show, but probably not one you'd want to be around to watch.There have been a few “close calls� since

we first developed nuclear weapons. A surprisingnumber of these were technical glitches that nearly started World War 3, on both sidesof the Cold War. The average yield of a modern nuclear weaponis around 500 kilotons of TNT, that's 25 times more powerful than the bomb droppedon Nagasaki. Each one of these 500 kiloton bombs are powerful enough to flatten hugeparts of a large modern city such as New York, or London.And there exists some truly unimaginably powerful weapons, like the Tsar Bomba, which had ayield of more than 50 megatonnes. That's two and a half THOUSAND times more powerfulthan the one dropped on Nagasaki. Thankfully

Will We Ever Run Out of New Music

Hey, Vsauce. Michael here. And the iTunes store contains 28 million different songs. Last.fm carries 45 million songs and theGracenote database of artists, titles, and labels contains 130 million different songs.That's a lot. If you were to listen to all of the songs in the Gracenote database oneafter the other in a giant playlist, it would take you more than 1,200 years to complete. But since there are a finite number of tonesour ears can distinguish and because it only takes a few notes in common for two musicalideas to sound similar, will we ever run out of new musicé

Will there ever be a day where every possiblebrief little melody has been written and recorded and we are left with nothing new to makeé A good rule of thumb might be to say thatif modern recording technology can't distinguish the difference between two songs, well, neithercould we. So, let's begin there, with digital downloads, MP3's, CD's, and a calculationmade by Covered in Bees. Digital music is made out of quot;bits.quot;Lots and lots of bits. But each individual bit exists in one of two states: a quot;0quot; or a quot;1.quot; Now, what this means in that for any given,say, 5minutelong audio file, the number

of possibilities, mathematically speaking,is enormous, but mindblowingly finite. A compact disk, which samples music at 44.1kHz, is going to need about 211 million bits to store one 5minute song. And because abit can exist in two states, either a quot;0quot; or a quot;1,quot; the number of possible differentways to arrange those 211,000,000 bits is 2 to the 211th million power. That value represents every single possibledifferent 5minutelong audio file. But how big is that numberéWell, let's put this in perspective. A single drop of water contains 6 sextillionatoms. 6 sextillion is 22 digits long. That's

a long number. But the total number of atomsthat make up the entire earth is a number that is about 50 digits long. And estimationsof the total number of hydrogen atoms in our universe is a number that is 80 digits long. But quot;2 to the 211 millionth power,quot; the numberof possible, different 5minute audio files, is a number that is 63 million digits long. It is a numberlarger than we can even pretend to understand. It contains every possible CD quality 5minuteaudio file. Inside that amount is everything from Beethoven's quot;5thquot; to Beck's quot;Loserquot; it even contains a 5 minute conversation you had with your parents when you were 3 years old.In fact, every one of them. It even contains

every possible conversation you didn't havewith your parents when you were 3 years old. But, it is finite, not infinite. It's coolto think about, but it doesn't come very close to answering the question of this tutorial, whichis quot;how many possible different songs can we create and hear the difference betweenéquot; So, for that, we're going to need to narrowdown our hunt. On Everything2, Ferrouslepidoptera made acalculation that involved some assumptions that I think helped narrow the field downin a really nice way. She took a look at the total number of possibledifferent melodies you could create within

one octave, containing any or all of the intervalswe divide octaves into. Of course, sound frequencies can be divided much more granularly than that,but giving ourselves more notes might mean we could make more technically different melodies,but they wouldn't necessarily sound any different to our ears. Now, given a single measure containing anycombination of whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth or thirtysecond notes, she calculatedthat there would be this many possible unique measures, which is a smaller number than wehad before, but, to put it in perspective, this is how many seconds old the universe is.

Luke Bryan Huntin Fishin And Lovin Every Day

♪WOAH♪ ♪WOAH♪ ♪MMM♪ ♪ IF I COULD MAKE A LIVIN' FROMWALKIN' IN THE WOODS ♪ ♪ YOU CAN BET I'D BE SITTIN'PRETTY GOOD ♪ ♪ HIGH ON A HILL, LOOKIN' AT AFIELD DOWN WIND ♪ ♪ IF I COULD MAKE A NICKEL OFFOF TURNIN' THEM BASS ♪ ♪ NEVER WORRY 'BOUT THEPRICE OF GAS ♪

♪I'D BE WHEELIN' AND DEALIN'AND SITTIN' THERE REELIN' EM IN♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ THAT'S THE PRAYER THAT ACOUNTRY BOY PRAYS ♪ ♪ THANK GOD HE MADEME THIS WAY ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ EARLY IN THE MORNIN', LATE INTHE EVENIN' ♪ ♪ I'M GETTIN' RED DIRT RICH ANDFLINT RIVER PAID ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪

♪♪♪♪♪ ♪ I GET A LITTLE FARMPOND BUZZ ♪ ♪ SOUND OF GRAVEL WHENI'M BACKIN' UP ♪ ♪ PULLIN' THE STRING ON A 9.9TWOSTROKE, MERCURY ♪ ♪ I LOVE IT WHEN MY BABYWANTS TO ROLL WITH ME ♪ ♪ THROWS HER BOOTS ON,CLIMBS IN A TREE ♪ ♪ TUCKIN' HER HAIR IN MY HATAND SHE'S READY TO GO ♪ ♪ AND WE GET TO ♪

♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ THAT'S THE PRAYER THATA COUNTRY BOY PRAYS ♪ ♪ THANK GOD HE MADEME THIS WAY ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ EARLY IN THE MORNIN', LATE INTHE EVENIN' ♪ ♪ I'M GETTIN' RED DIRT RICH ANDFLINT RIVER PAID ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪♪♪♪♪

♪ SO, WHILE Y'ALL AREUP THERE ♪ ♪ BREATHIN' IN THATOLD DIRTY AIR ♪ ♪ I'LL BE DOWN HEREKNEEDEEP IN THE MUCKALEE ♪ ♪♪♪♪♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ I WANNA SEE THEM TALLPINES SWAY ♪ ♪ Y'ALL CLOSE THEM EYES ♪ ♪ LET'S GO THERE IN OURMINDS ♪

♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ THAT'S THE PRAYER THISCOUNTRY BOY PRAYS ♪ ♪ THANK GOD HE MADEME THIS WAY ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪ ♪ BLACK COFFEE INTHE MORNIN' ♪ ♪ DARK WHISKEY INTHE EVENIN' ♪ ♪ I'M GETTIN' RED DIRT RICH ANDFLINT RIVER PAID ♪ ♪ HUNTIN', FISHIN' AND LOVIN'EVERY DAY ♪

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