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Travel Tips And Advice

A List of Travel Tips to Make Your Vacation Planning Easier

Encounters At The End Of The World Vimeo

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Key Peele Alien Imposters

spaceship engines roar WAIT, WAIT. WE GOT TO BE CAREFUL HERE. THIS PLACE IS CRAWLINGWITH THEM. WHAT WAS THATé WHATé COVER ME. GUYS! HEY, GUYS! HEY, GUYS.OH, THANK GOD.

HEY, WE STARTEDA COMMUNITY OF SURVIVORS. Y'ALL COME LIVE WITH US. WAIT.HOW DID YOU KNOWé COME ON. REDNECK WANTS US TO MOVEINTO HIS COMMUNITYé USéLET'S GO. GUYS, OVER HERE! OH, THANK GOD THERE ARE OTHERS!

WOULD YOU LETME DATE YOUR DAUGHTERé OF COURSE! OH, MY GOD. OH, MY GOD.OH, MY GOD. OH, MY GOD. AAH!PLEASE DON'T HURT ME! MY BEST FRIEND IS BLACKAND I LOVE JAYZ, AND MY FAVORITE MOVIEIS lt;igt;THINK LIKE A MAN.lt;igt; SHE'S GOOD. COME WITH US. OKAY. STAY CLOSE.

OKAY. WHAT'S YOUR NAMEé EMILY.both: OF COURSE IT IS. tense dubstep music ♪ HEY, HEY, HEY!DON'T SHOOT! DON'T SHOOT! WHAT DO YOU THINKABOUT THE POLICEé WELL,I LOVE THEIR THIRD ALBUM.

AAH! AAH!stammers I DON'T HAVE ANY MONEY! NO MONEY! screaming continues screaming OH, MY GOD. OH, MY GOD. THANK GOD YOU GUYS SHOWED UP. I GOT TO GET OUT OF HERE.

IT'S A SILVER LEXUS. JUST PULL IT RIGHT UP FRONT, AND DON'T SCUFF THE PAINT,ALL RIGHTé I JUST HAD IT BUFFED. WAS HE AN ALIEN, TOOé YEP.

The Columbian Exchange Crash Course World History 23

Hi. I'm John Green, this is Crash CourseWorld History and today's tutorial is kind of a response to one of the most riveting historybooks you'll ever read, the Columbian Exchange by David Crosby. He had a good year in 1969published The Columbian Exchange, played Woodstock, he was still on his first liver. Whaté Itwas Albert Crosbyé Gash! History, never being as interesting as I want it to be. Right, so it was Alfred Crosby Jr., and inthat book he wrote, quot;The big questions are really the only ones worth considering, andcolossal nerve has always been a prerequisite for such consideration.quot; I love it!

Before 1492, we couldn't really talk abouta world history at all, we could only talk about the different histories of separateregions, but Columbus changed all of that, and everything else. The Columbian Exchangeirrevocably homogenized the world's biological landscape. Since Columbus, the number of plantand animal species has continually diminished, and the variation in species from place toplace has diminished dramatically. I mean, the first European visitors to the Americashad never seen a tomato or a catfish; Native Americans had never seen a horse, and by makingour planet biologically singular, the Columbian Exchange completely remade the populationsof animals, particularly humans. And vitally,

this crosspollination also made possiblesuch wonders as contemporary pizza. theme music So we're going to break the Columbian Exchangedown into four categories: Diseases, boy, you're looking good Smallpox, I'm glad you'vebeen eliminated; Animals, Plants, and People. Mr. Green, Mr. Green! People are animals. Yeah, that's true, me from the past, but justfor the sake of simplicity we're Also, when you think about it, microbes arekinda animals and plants are, too, I mean Oh my god, shut up before I kill you and createa time travel paradox.

Microbes, like those hairy blokes back there,were a definite negative in terms of the Columbian Exchange. Terminology is hard here, but themajority of Caribbean Islanders or Native Americans or Amerindians had exactly one responseto the arrival of Europeans: death. We can't be sure of how many natives diedas a result of European arrival but it was definitely more than 50% and some estimatesplace it as high as 90%. Historians used to blame European brutality, which was definitelya factor, but the main culprit was disease. Smallpox is usually seen as the villain ofthe story but it is more likely that a series of diseases in combination did the damage.Along with smallpox, Americans were killed

by measles and mumps, typhus, chicken pox,none of which they had been previously exposed to. This astonishing decrease of populationwas definitely the worst effect of these diseases, both psychologically and demographically. But the secondary effects were almost as bad.For one thing the deaths of Aztec and Incan rulers touched off wars which made it easierto spread disease, because you know, the number one way to catch smallpox is via handtohandcombat. Plus leaders kept dying. Huayna Capac, the leader of the Incan empire, succumbedto smallpox before Pizarro even arrived. His death led to a violent succession strugglebetween his sons which was won by Atahualpa,

who in turn was captured and killed by Pizarro.And without that war, the Inca would have had a much better chance against the Spaniards,whose numbers were comparatively tiny. A similar thing happened to the Aztecs. The Moctezumawho eventually lost to Cortés was the nephew of a much more powerful king who died of smallpox.And the death of that great king encouraged some of the smaller states in the Aztec empire to rebel,and some of them even fought for the Spaniards. And another effect of disease was starvation,because there simply weren't enough people left to grow crops to feed the living. Andthe malnutrition made survivors that much more susceptible to disease. In short, itsucked.

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